Archive | March, 2010

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Georgia Ranks Third in Mortgages Past Due

Posted on 07 March 2010 by Aaron Hofmann

Georgia is third in the nation, with 13.5 percent of mortgages one or more payment past due as of December 31st, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s National Delinquency Survey. Florida and Nevada came in at #1 and #2.

The MBA said the drop in the 30-day delinquency rate is “a concrete sign” that the end of the mortgage crisis may be near. That’s important because mortgages that are 30 days late generally serve as a leading indicator of serious delinquencies and foreclosures.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury recently reported while more than 1 million U.S. homeowners have started the process of modifying their home loans under the government’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), only 116,000 have actually had their mortgages modified as of last month.

In Georgia, there have been 33,059 active trial loan modifications through January. Of them, 4,508 have been permanently modified.

Atlanta is among the top 15 metro areas for HAMP activity, accounting for 3.2 percent of overall HAMP activity. The city had 30,285 active trial loan modifications through January. Of those, 3,692 were permanently modified.

If you or someone you is having financial issues and concerned about foreclosure, contact us for a free report on Avoiding Foreclosure.

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28% of Georgia Homes with Mortgages are Underwater

Posted on 05 March 2010 by Aaron Hofmann

That’s right, 28%. Not a good number.

More than 441,500, or 28 percent, of all residential properties with mortgages in Georgia, were in negative equity at the end of the fourth quarter, according to a new report. The report was prepared by Santa Ana, Calif.-based First American CoreLogic Inc., a real estate information company.

Negative equity, also commonly known as underwater or upside down, means that borrowers owe more on their mortgage than their homes are worth. Negative equity can occur because of a decline in value, an increase in mortgage debt or a combination of both.

More than 11.3 million, or 24 percent, of all residential properties in the United States with mortgages, were in negative equity, up from 10.7 million and 23 percent at the end of the third quarter. The aggregate dollar value of negative equity was $801 billion, up from $746 billion in the third quarter of 2009.

The net increase in the number of negative equity borrowers in the fourth quarter was 620,000, with the largest percentage increases occurring in Nevada, Georgia and Arizona.

“Negative equity is a significant drag on both the housing market and on economic growth. It is driving foreclosures and decreasing mobility for millions of homeowners,” said Mark Fleming, chief economist with First American CoreLogic, in a statement.

First American CoreLogic’s data includes 47 million properties with a mortgage, which accounts for more than 85 percent of all mortgages in the United States.

Having negative equity does not mean that your home will be foreclosed, but it does indicate homes that are “under-water” and if the homeowner is having financial difficulties, foreclosure proceedings can happen pretty quickly.

If you or someone you is having financial issues and concerned about foreclosure, contact us for a free report on Avoiding Foreclosure.

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New Foreclosure Prevention Measures Planned

Posted on 01 March 2010 by Aaron Hofmann

Apparently someone is starting to realize that the government’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) is not very effective. The Obama administration is considering expanding their attempt to to ease the housing crisis by banning all foreclosures on home loans unless they have been screened and rejected under the program.

Currently, lenders can begin foreclosure proceedings on any loan that hasn’t been submitted for HAMP eligibility. In the state of Georgia, it only takes one month to foreclose on a property, so slowing down the process would allow more time for the banks to consider alternatives for Georgia homeowners.

Under current HAMP rules, foreclosure litigation can proceed while borrowers are under review for the program or even in a trial modification.

The proposed changes would prohibit lenders from initiating new foreclosure actions before loan screening by HAMP and would require lenders to halt existing proceedings for borrowers once they are in a trial repayment plan.

About 89 percent of outstanding residential mortgage loans are covered by the voluntary HAMP program.

About 2.82 million U.S. homeowners lost properties to foreclosure last year and 4.5 million filings are expected in 2010, according to industry sources.

The Treasury proposal would require all borrowers who are 60 or more days delinquent on their mortgage to be sought out for participation in HAMP. Mortgage companies would need to try to contact the borrower at least four times by phone and twice by certified mail over 30 or more days before going to foreclosure.

Under current Treasury policy, foreclosure proceedings are only halted when a borrower receives a permanent modification plan.

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